You can’t buy more time no matter how much money you have. Whether you are Warren Buffet or the janitor at his company, you both have the same amount of time in a day—24 hours, 1440 minutes, 86,400 seconds. How you choose to spend it is up to you.

I believe companies like Uber are popular not because of the convenience they provide, but because of the time they save us by not making us wait for a cab that may or may not drive by. In a world that moves at an eye blinking pace and with so many demands, we must choose to spend this limited resource carefully.

One of the values at J2 is relationships—it also happens to be one of mine. After work, I could go home and watch TV or continue working (which I sometimes do to decompress), but for the most part I choose to spend time with clients, prospects, family, and friends to deepen those relationships.

“Time is free, but it’s priceless. You can’t own it, but you can use it. You can’t keep it, but you can spend it. Once you’ve lost it you can never get it back.” —Harvey MacKay

How do you value your time?

  • To realize the value of ONE YEAR, ask a student who failed a grade.
  • To realize the value of ONE MONTH, ask a mother who has given birth to a premature baby.
  • To realize the value of ONE WEEK, ask the editor of a weekly newspaper.
  • To realize the value of ONE HOUR, ask the couple who are waiting to meet.
  • To realize the value of ONE MINUTE, ask a person who just missed a train.
  • To realize the value of ONE SECOND, ask someone who just avoided an accident.
  • To realize the value of ONE MILLISECOND, ask the person who won a silver medal at the Olympics.

Have a great weekend.

—Vijay

About Friday Food for Thought (FFfT)

I frequently attend conferences and retreats on entrepreneurship and leadership and while I am away, the J2 team picks up the slack, allowing me to learn to be better at what I do. I wanted to share what I was learning with my team, so I created the weekly FFfT emails in November of 2015 and have been writing them ever since.

Before long, the J2 staff began sharing the FFfT emails with their friends and family and now other leaders have asked to be included, which led to the creation of this newsletter. I hope you enjoy!

You can’t buy more time no matter how much money you have. Whether you are Warren Buffet or the janitor at his company, you both have the same amount of time in a day – 24 hours, 1440 minutes, 86,400 seconds. How you choose to spend it is up to you.

I believe companies like Uber are popular not because of the convenience they provide, but because of the time they save us by not making us wait for a cab that may or may not drive by. In a world that moves at an eye blinking pace and with so many demands, we must choose to spend this limited resource carefully.

One of the values at J2 is relationships – it also happens to be one of mine. After work, I could go home and watch TV or continue working (which I sometimes do to decompress), but for the most part I choose to spend time with clients, prospects, family, and friends to deepen those relationships.

“Time is free, but it’s priceless. You can’t own it, but you can use it. You can’t keep it, but you can spend it. Once you’ve lost it you can never get it back.”  – Harvey MacKay

How do you value your time?

  • To realize the value of ONE YEAR, ask a student who failed a grade.
  • To realize the value of ONE MONTH, ask a mother who has given birth to a premature baby.
  • To realize the value of ONE WEEK, ask the editor of a weekly newspaper.
  • To realize the value of ONE HOUR, ask the couple who are waiting to meet.
  • To realize the value of ONE MINUTE, ask a person who just missed a train.
  • To realize the value of ONE SECOND, ask someone who just avoided an accident.
  • To realize the value of ONE MILLISECOND, ask the person who won a silver medal at the Olympics.

Have a great weekend.

– Vijay

About Friday Food for Thought (FFfT)

I frequently attend conferences and retreats on entrepreneurship and leadership and while I am away, the J2 team picks up the slack, allowing me to learn to be better at what I do. I wanted to share what I was learning with my team, so I created the weekly FFfT emails in November of 2015 and have been writing them ever since.

Before long, the J2 staff began sharing the FFfT emails with their friends and family and now other leaders have asked to be included, which led to the creation of this newsletter. I hope you enjoy!

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