“Taking your quiet time will always give you more time.” —Ganellyn Condie

During our meeting earlier this week, Jim talked about quiet time to reflect and focus. The concept of quiet time has come up recently in my readings as well as in conversations with very successful executives, managers, and business owners.

You may remember that in an earlier FFfT I talked about spending 31 minutes on a morning routine, part of that routine is 10 minutes of quiet time. It has been very helpful in allowing me to focus. Not 100% yet, but I get better every day.

I was watching a show called Billions where the two main characters, a billionaire hedge manager and the US Attorney General are shown taking some timed quiet time. Apparently even Hollywood is getting into the act.

Here are some tips to help you:

  • Identify a time and quiet place to think. Turn off all electronic devices.
  • Take deep breaths. Notice each inhale and exhale. Repeat until you feel yourself beginning to relax (ideal breathing is six breaths a minute).
  • Let your mind wander. When you catch yourself thinking of something pressing you have to do, picture a wave at the ocean, ride the wave as you think of the task clogging your mind and release it as the wave breaks ashore.
  • Become an observer and tune into the noises in the house. A ticking clock, a rattling pipe, the sound of a squirrel on the roof, etc. Practice becoming aware of those things you never even notice.
  • As your mind begins to slow further, whisper a mantra or an affirmation for the day ahead you are committing to.

Sounds counter intuitive, but being quiet actually helps you focus and be present.

 

And from Riv… http://jimriviello.com/quiet-time/

“We need quiet time to examine our lives openly and honestly—Spending quiet time alone gives your mind an opportunity to renew itself and create order.” —Susan Taylor

Have a great weekend.

—Vijay

About Friday Food for Thought (FFfT)

I frequently attend conferences and retreats on entrepreneurship and leadership and while I am away, the J2 team picks up the slack, allowing me to learn to be better at what I do. I wanted to share what I was learning with my team, so I created the weekly FFfT emails in November of 2015 and have been writing them ever since.

Before long, the J2 staff began sharing the FFfT emails with their friends and family and now other leaders have asked to be included, which led to the creation of this newsletter. I hope you enjoy!

“Taking your quiet time will always give you more time.” —Ganellyn Condie

During our meeting earlier this week, Jim talked about quiet time to reflect and focus. The concept of quiet time has come up recently in my readings as well as in conversations with very successful executives, managers, and business owners.

You may remember that in an earlier FFfT I talked about spending 31 minutes on a morning routine, part of that routine is 10 minutes of quiet time. It has been very helpful in allowing me to focus. Not 100% yet, but I get better every day.

I was watching a show called Billions where the two main characters, a billionaire hedge manager and the US Attorney General are shown taking some timed quiet time. Apparently even Hollywood is getting into the act.

Here are some tips to help you:

  • Identify a time and quiet place to think. Turn off all electronic devices.
  • Take deep breaths. Notice each inhale and exhale. Repeat until you feel yourself beginning to relax (ideal breathing is six breaths a minute).
  • Let your mind wander. When you catch yourself thinking of something pressing you have to do, picture a wave at the ocean, ride the wave as you think of the task clogging your mind and release it as the wave breaks ashore.
  • Become an observer and tune into the noises in the house. A ticking clock, a rattling pipe, the sound of a squirrel on the roof, etc. Practice becoming aware of those things you never even notice.
  • As your mind begins to slow further, whisper a mantra or an affirmation for the day ahead you are committing to.

Sounds counter intuitive, but being quiet actually helps you focus and be present.

 

And from Riv… http://jimriviello.com/quiet-time/

“We need quiet time to examine our lives openly and honestly—Spending quiet time alone gives your mind an opportunity to renew itself and create order.” —Susan Taylor

Have a great weekend.

—Vijay

About Friday Food for Thought (FFfT)

I frequently attend conferences and retreats on entrepreneurship and leadership and while I am away, the J2 team picks up the slack, allowing me to learn to be better at what I do. I wanted to share what I was learning with my team, so I created the weekly FFfT emails in November of 2015 and have been writing them ever since.

Before long, the J2 staff began sharing the FFfT emails with their friends and family and now other leaders have asked to be included, which led to the creation of this newsletter. I hope you enjoy!

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